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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017


CONFERENCE  DAY 3 

8:30 - 10:30 AM
SYMPOSIUM

PRESIDENTIAL SYMPOSIUM: NEURAL PROCESSING OF FOOD CUES 
Chair/Organizer: Patricia Sue Grigson and Gorica Petrovich
Salle de bal Centre

8:30
#82
Interactions between striatal plasticity and individual susceptibility to obesity and their influence food-seeking behavior
CR FERRARIO1,2, Y ALONSO-CARABALLO2, RC DERMAN2, M OGINSKY1. 1Univ of MI, Dept. of Pharmacology, Ann Arbor, MI, United States2Univ of MI, Neuro Sci Grad Program, Ann Arbor, MI, United States

9:00
#83
The role of leptin, GLP-1 analogues and 5HT2c receptor agonists in activating brain areas in response to food cues in lean and obese humns 
C MANTZOROS. Harvard, boston, MA, United States

9:30
#84
Homeostatic circuits selectively gate food cue responses in insular cortex
Y LIVNEH1, RR RAMESH1, CB BURGESS1,2, KM LEVANDOWSKI1, JC MADARA1, H FENSELAU1, GJ GOLDEY1, VE DIAZ1, N JIKOMES1,2, JM RESCH1, BB LOWELL1,2, ML ANDERMANN1,2. 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States2Program in Neuroscience, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States

10:00
#85
Seeing what you (might) want, wanting what you (can’t) see: Dissecting prefrontal contributions to motivated choice in humans
LK FELLOWS. McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

10:30 - 11:00 AM
BREAK

BREAK
Salle de bal Ouest

11:00 - 12:00 PM
LECTURE

MARS LECTURE 2
Chair/Organizer: Kyle Burger
Salle de bal Centre

11:00
#86
The Calculus of Calories: Quantitative Physiology of Human Body Weight Regulation
K.D. HALL. NIDDK/NIH, Bethesda, MD, United States

12:00 - 1:30 PM
LUNCH ON OWN

LUNCH ON OWN
Lunch

12:00 - 1:30 PM
LUNCH SESSION

MEET THE PROFESSOR LUNCH
Lunch On Own

1:30 - 3:30 PM
SYMPOSIUM

CONSIDERING OUR METHODS
Chair/Organizer: Alain Dagher
Salle de bal Centre

1:30
#87
Improving reproducibility of neuroimaging research
RA POLDRACK. Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

2:00
#88
How confident are we that dopamine D2 receptors are related to weight and obesity?
DH ZALD1, LC DANG1, CT SMITH1, GR SAMANEZ=LARKIN2, SF PERKINS1, RL COWAN1. 1Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, United States2Duke University, Durhman, NC, United States

2:30
#89
CONSIDERING OUR METHODS: METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES WITH ANIMAL MODELS OF APPETITE AND OBESITY RESEARCH
TA LUTZ. University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

3:00
#90
Focusing a new lens on dietary asessment methods
CJ BOUSHEY1, F ZHU2, EJ DELP2, DA KERR3. 1University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, United States2Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States3Curtin University, Perth, Australia

1:30 - 3:30 PM
ORAL SESSION

ORAL 4: GUT BRAIN SIGNALING
Chair/Organizer: Megan Daily
Salle de bal Est

1:30
#91
Calories are necessary and sufficient for sustained reductions in AgRP neuron activity
AL ALHADEFF, Z SU, JN BETLEY. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States

1:45
#92
Vagal afferent neurons innervating the gut control feeding behavior differently depending on diet and metabolic state in rats
C DIEPENBROEK, D QUINN, G DE LARTIGUE. JB Pierce lab/ Yale, New Haven , CT, United States

2:00
#93
Metabolites from obesity-associated bacteria promote inflammation in cultured vagal afferent neurons
CR CAWTHON, RA KIRKLAND, CB DE LA SERRE. University of Georgia Department of Foods and Nutrition, Athens, GA, United States

2:15
#94
Vertical sleeve gastrectomy does not increase ethanol intake in rats or mice
ER ORELLANA1, C JAMIS1, K CZAJA2, A HAJNAL1. 1Dept. of Neural and Behavioral Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Herhsey, PA, United States2Veterinary Biosciences and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States

2:30
#95
The interactive effects of intragastric fructose infusion and emotional state on homeostatic and hedonic brain regions
J IVEN, JR BIESIEKIERSKI, D ZHAO, J TACK, L VAN OUDENHOVE. TARGID, Leuven, Belgium

2:45
#96
Postprandial Gut Hormone and Diurnal Appetite Responses in Overweight and Obese Individuals Varying According to Satiety Responsiveness.  
S HOLLINGWORTH, M DALTON, J BLUNDELL, G FINLAYSON. University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom

3:00
#97
Disruption of the light cycle abrogates circadian rhythmicity of gastric vagal afferent satiety signalling 
SJ KENTISH1, S CHRISTIE1, GA WITTERT1,2, AJ PAGE1,2. 1University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia2South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia

3:15
#98
Peripheral cannabinoid CB1 receptors control the release of gut-derived satiation peptides
DA ARGUETA, NV DIPATRIZIO. Division of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, United States

3:30 - 4:00 PM
BREAK

BREAK
Salle de bal Ouest

4:00 - 6:00 PM
ORAL SESSION

ORAL 5: ADAPTING TO DIET
Chair/Organizer: Carrie Ferrario
Salle de bal Est

4:00
#103
Support for the inverted-U association between BMI and dopamine-dependent behavior
MV BURKE1,2, AG DIFELICEANTONIO2,3, G COPPIN4, X SUN5, P GEHA2,3, DM SMALL2,3. 1INP, Yale Univ, New Haven, CT, United States2JB Pierce Lab, New Haven, CT, United States3Psychiatry, Yale Univ, New Haven, CT, United States4Psychology, Univ of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland5Psychology, UPenn, Philadelphia, PA, United States

4:15
#104
NITA AWARD WINNER: Intermittent access to palatable food leads to cyclic whole-body metabolism
SR SPIERLING, AD KREISLER, SY FANG, CA WILLIAMS, KT KINES, EP ZORRILLA. The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, United States

4:30
#105
The Sympathetic Nervous System is Required for Systemic Adaptation to the Ketogenic Diet 
BN DESAI1, N DOURIS1, FM FISHER1, DA MORGAN2, K RAHMOUNI2, JS FLIER1, TJ BARTNESS3, E MARATOS-FLIER1. 1Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States2Pharmacology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States3Center for Obesity Reversal, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, United States

4:45
#106
Relationships between Dietary Intake of Added Sugar, GLP-1, and Striatal Responses to Food Cues 
HM DORTON, S LUO, KA PAGE. University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States

5:00
#107
Caloric intake induced increases in Cocaine and Amphetamine Regulated Transcript expression in vagal afferent neurons is permanently blunted after high-fat high-sugar diet
G DE LARTIGUE, D QUINN. JB Pierce/Yale, New Haven, CT, United States

5:15
#108
Enhanced amygdala activity mediates hippocampal memory impairment induced by HFD during adolescence
F NANEIX1, M SANTOYO ZEDILLO2,3, G PACHECO-LOPEZ3,4, E COUTUREAU1, G FERREIRA2. 1INCIA, UMR 5287 CNRS/ Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, France2NutriNeuro, UMR 1286 INRA/ Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, France3Metropolitan University (UAM) at Lerma, Lerma, Mexico4Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich, Schwerzenbach, Switzerland

5:30
#109
NITA AWARD WINNER: Functional connectivity within the gustatory network is altered by fat content and oral fat sensitivity
S FRANK-PODLECH1, JM HEINZE1, A FRITSCHE1, M LIDOLT2, J HINRICHS2, R VEIT1, H PREISSL1. 1IDM Tübingen, DZD e.V., Tübingen, Germany2University of Hohenheim, Dep. Soft Matter Science and Dairy Technology, Stuttgart, Germany

5:45
#110
Neurocognitive Implications of Non-Nutritive Sweetener Intake among Overweight and Obese Adults
AR COVELLO, AD WALK, CG EDWARDS, GE REESER, NA KHAN. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, United States

4:30 - 6:00 PM
SYMPOSIUM

HOW THE CHEMICAL SENSES SHAPE GUT-BRAIN COMMUNICATION
Chair/Organizer: Kees de Graaf
Salle de bal Centre

4:30
#99
Behavioral Evidence for Chemospecific Integration of Oral and Postoral Signals in Rodents
LA SCHIER, AC SPECTOR. Psychology Dept and Neuroscience Program, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States

5:00
#101
The mechanisms and functions of oral fat detection in humans
R.D. MATTES. Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, United States

5:30
#102
Cephalic-phase insulin release in mice: mechanistic basis and functional significance
J.I. GLENDINNING. Barnard College, Columbia University, New York, NY, United States

6:00 - 8:00 PM
POSTER

POSTER SESSION II
Salle de bal Ouest

1
1
#111
Mifepristone (RU 486) reduces responding for palatable food during extended intermittent, but not continuous access conditions. 
AD KREISLER1, SR SPIERLING1, CA WILLIAMS1, SY FANG1, CY HUANG1, LF VENDRUSCOLO2, EP ZORRILLA1. 1Department of Neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA, United States2NIDA-IRP, NIH, Baltimore, MD, United States

2
2
#112
Oxytocin as a central mediator of tryptophan-driven hypophagia
A KLOCKARS1, SN GARTNER1, EA CARPENTER2, CG PROSSER2, AS LEVINE3, PK OLSZEWSKI1,3. 1University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand2Dairy Goat Co-operative (NZ) Ltd, Hamilton, New Zealand3Dept. of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, United States

3
3
#113
Amylin- and GLP-1-combination pharmacotherapies for obesity treatment
KL KOCH-LASKOWSKI, LE MCGRATH, E SHAULSON, MR HAYES. Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States

4
4
#114
Additive and synergistic reductions in food intake by amylin and exendin-4 dose combinations
YL YAN, TH MORAN. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States

5
5
#115
Amylin receptor activation in the accumbens core decreases chow intake in rats with access to fat solution
TJ GUSTAFSON, EG MIETLICKI-BAASE. Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, United States

6
6
#116
Obesity Status Moderates Behavioral Sensitivity to a Mindful Eating Treatment
E.B. RASMUSSEN, B. PERSCHON, Y. LEE, L.R. RODRIGUEZ. Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID, United States

7
7
#117
Identification of neural substrates underlying cancer-induced anorexia and malaise
CA CAMPOS, AJ BOWEN, RD PALMITER, MW SCHWARTZ. University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States

8
8
#118
CNS REWARD PATHWAYS IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA: INSIGHTS FROM A RAT MODEL
BJ OLDFIELD, LK MILTON, CJ FOLDI. Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

9
9
#119
Effects of olanzapine on resilience and vulnerability to activity-based anorexia in rats
S GALLANT, N CHUJUNIAN, M DA PAZ, M GOUDREAU-THIBAUDEAU, U SHALEV. CSBN, Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada

10
10
#120
The influence of cannabinoids on weight loss in a rodent model of anorexia nervosa
SB OGDEN1, AM MORAN1, M MALAMAS2, A MAKRIYANNIS2, LA ECKEL1. 1Prog in Neuroscience, Florida State Univ, Tallahassee, FL, United States2Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern Univ, Boston, MA, United States

11
11
#121
Eating in the Absence of Hunger, Loss of Control Over Eating and Future Weight Gain
MR LOWE, EH FEIG. Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, United States

12
12
#122
Early high-fat diet induces hippocampal sinaptic plasticity alterations and depressive-like behavior in adult male rats
DM ARCEGO, AP TONIAZZO, R KROLOW, C LAMPERT, C BERLITZ, E GARCIA, C LAZZARETTI, C DALMAZ. Departamento de Bioquímica, ICBS, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil

13
13
#123
Bullies CD-1 retired breeder mice are resilient to cross-sensitization among stress, alcohol intake, and salty high-fat diet preference.
JN MORALES, A WHITE, M HERRERA-GONZALES, DTB PEREIRA-DERDERIAN. School of Mathematics and Sciences, Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, TX, United States

14
14
#124
Bullied C57BL/6J mice display cross-sensitization between stress-induced alcohol dependence and salty high-fat diet preference: aversive salty high fat diet becomes palatable.
M HERRERA-GONZALES, JN MORALES, DTB PEREIRA-DERDERIAN. School of Mathematics and Sciences, Wayland Baptist University, Plainview, TX, United States

15
15
#125
The Effect of Manipulated Mood on Food Intake
AE PINK, C WILLIAMS, M LEE. Swansea University, Swansea, United Kingdom

16
16
#126
Do correlates of stress-induced eating differ for women with high and low chronic stress?
RR KLATZKIN, A BALDASSARO, S RASHID, E HAYDEN, C CATTANEO, R DASANI. Rhodes College, Memphis, TN, United States

17
17
#127
To eat or not to eat: Influence of alternatives on food reinforcement
KA CARR, LH EPSTEIN. University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, United States

18
18
#128
The effect of descriptive social norm and health messages on vegetable selection in student restaurant settings
E.I. COLLINS1, J.M THOMAS2, E.L. ROBINSON3, P. AVEYARD4, S. JEBB4, C.P. HERMAN5, S. HIGGS1. 1University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom2Aston University, Birmingham, United Kingdom3University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom4University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom5University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

19
19
#129
Changes in Food Craving Inventory and Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire subscales predict changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging food-cue reactivity in a 3-week calorie restriction intervention
C KAHATHUDUWA, T DAVIS, M O'BOYLE, M BINKS. Texas Tech U., Lubbock, TX, United States

20
20
#130
Less is more: high self-controllers rely less on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to suppress food craving
JE HAN, U VAINIK, J GUAN, A DAGHER. Montreal Neurological Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada

21
21
#131
IMPULSIVITY LINKED TO UNDERACTIVATION OF STRIATAL REGIONS IN RESPONSE TO SWEET TASTE WHEN FED
AV ELY1,2, CE WIERENGA2, A BISCHOFF-GRETHE2, U BAILER2,3, WH KAYE2. 1Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE, United States2University of California, San Diego, CA, United States3Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria

22
22
#132
Recall of High Calorie Food Words and Neutral Words Increases Over Time for Adults in Weight Loss Treatment, But Recall of Low Calorie Food Words Does Not
SL APPLETON-KNAPP1, S HIGGS2, T MONREAL1, D EICHEN1, DR STRONG1, KN BOUTELLE1. 1UCSD, San Diego, CA, United States2U of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom

23
23
#133
Attentional focus and task demands determine brain responses to visual food cues
T NOESSELT, TM POHL. Biopsychology, OvG-University, Magdeburg, Germany

24
24
#134
Understanding how food labels, sensory quality and nutrients guide calorie estimation and selection in Asia
K MCCRICKERD, CS TANG, CG FORDE. Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, A*STAR, Singapore, Singapore

25
25
#135
Implicit and explicit attitudes towards food in American and French children: A cross-cultural study
L MARTY1, S MONNERY-PATRIS1, S CHAMBARON1, S NICKLAUS1, C A FORESTELL2. 1UMR CSGA INRA, Dijon, France2Department of Psychological Science The College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA, United States

26
26
#136
The Role of Cognitive Conflict in Food Consumption
CA FORESTELL, LS GOLDBERG. The College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA, United States

27
27
#137
Influence of impending healthy food consumption on snacking: Nudging vs. Compensatory behavior
AY SIM1, JB KOH2, BK CHEON1,2. 1Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, A*STAR, Singapore, Singapore2Psychology Division, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore

28
28
#138
Subjective socioeconomic status modulates perceptual sensitivity to energy density of beverages
BK CHEON1,2, EX LIM1, D ZAIHAN2, K MCCRICKERD1, CG FORDE1. 1Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, A*STAR, Singapore, Singapore2Psychology Division, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore

29
29
#139
Food liking influences self-control to eat healthy in women with (un)healthy BMI
A LAGUNA-CAMACHO. Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Toluca, Mexico

30
30
#140
Reward Preference Induced by Optogenetic Central Amygdala Stimulation Persists Despite Competitive Physiological Motivation
O M LOFARO, MJF ROBINSON. Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, United States

32
32
#142
Central oxytocin signaling reduces appetitive and motivational aspects of feeding
HS WALD, ZY ONG, HJ GRILL. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States

33
33
#143
Lateral septum GHSR effects on feeding
KD WALL, SJ TERRILL, ND MEDINA, DL WILLIAMS. Psychology Department & Program in Neuroscience, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States

34
34
#144
Medial prefrontal cortex neuronal ensemble activated during cue-food learning is necessary for cue-induced consumption
SE KEEFER, S COLE, LC ANDERSON, GD PETROVICH. Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, United States

35
35
#145
No free lunch: Decoding the hedonic value of food from human neuroimaging data
JR GILBERT, GE SHEARRER, KS BURGER. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States

36
36
#146
Exploring the role of hemispheric laterality during a meal: effects on appetite and eating behavior
M ALONSO-ALONSO, L PATRIARCA, N MILANI, S MANTON, G MAGEROWSKI. BIDMC, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States

37
37
#147
Prefronto-cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates the desire to eat in obesity: a pilot study
M ALONSO-ALONSO1, D REDOLAR-RIPOLL2, R VIEJO-SOBRERA2, EM MARRóN2, G CUATRECASAS3, P GARCíA LORDA2, G MAGEROWSKI1. 1BIDMC, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States2Cognitive NeuroLab. UOC, Barcelona, Spain3Clínica Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain

38
38
#148
Nicotine blocks acquisition of taste learning with no effect on olfactory learning  
GC LONEY, PJ MEYER. University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, United States

39
39
#149
Salivary proteins decrease orosensory sensitivity to quinine
LE MARTIN, KE KAY, A-M TORREGROSSA. SUNY University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, United States

40
40
#150
Orosensory feedback is both necessary and sufficient for regulation of a subset of salivary proteins.
KE KAY1, LE MARTIN1, L NIKONOVA2, AM TORREGROSSA1. 1SUNY University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, United States2Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, United States

41
41
#151
Predicting flavor and beverage type from brain imaging data 
KS BURGER, JR GILBERT, GS SHEARRER. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States

42
42
#152
High-resolution mapping of human tastant-selective cortex
KMC BENZ1, M HANKE2,3, E PORCU1,2, T NOESSELT1,3. 1Biological Psychology, OvGU, Magdeburg, Germany2Psychoinformatics, OvGU, Magdeburg, Germany3Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, OvGU, Magdeburg, Germany

43
43
#153
When do health and taste drive children’s food choices? The influence of context and weight status
L MARTY, M MIGUET, S NICKLAUS, S CHAMBARON, S MONNERY-PATRIS. INRA UMR CSGA, Dijon, France

44
44
#154
Identifying subpopulations of heavy drinkers: a sweet road to a better phenotypic characterization?
S BOUHLAL, MR LEE, M FAROKHNIA, L LEGGIO. CPN section, NIAAA/NIDA, Bethesda, MD, United States

45
45
#155
Preference for Sugar, not Fat, is Decreased Following Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass but not Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy.
KR SMITH, TH MORAN, S CARNELL, KE STEELE. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States

46
46
#156
Tastant-specific Responses in Human Insula to Food Pictures  
E PORCU1,2, K BENZ1, M HANKE2,3, T NOESSELT1,3. 1Biopsychology, OvG University, Magdeburg, Germany2Psychoinformatics, OvG University, Magdeburg, Germany3Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, OvG University, Magdeburg, Germany

47
47
#157
Weight change is associated with sweet taste perception and beverage intake: Differences by sex
RM TUCKER1, NL GARNEAU2, TM NUESSLE2, B MENDELSBERG2, S SHEPARD2. 1Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, United States2Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO, United States