SPLTRAK Abstract Submission
Birth weight predicts feeding behavior in siblings
M AGRANONIK4, H GAUDREAU2, M J MEANEY1, R D LEVITAN2, P P SILVEIRA3
1McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada/2University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada/33Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil/4Fundação de Economia e Estatística, Porto Alegre, Brazil
   Background/ Aim: Low Birth Weight (LBW) is implicated in the risk for adulthood diseases such as overweight, preceded by altered feeding behavior during childhood. Our objective was to investigate if a lower birth weight predicts different feeding behavior and food consumption between siblings. Methods: 30 sibling pairs from the cities of Montreal, Canada, were recruited from an established prospective birth cohort (the Maternal Adversity, Vulnerability and Neurodevelopment – MAVAN - project). At 48-months of age, mothers completed the Children Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ) and a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Analyses were performed considering each child of a sibling’s pair in one group, so that environmental influences could be controlled.  Generalized Estimating Equations were used to evaluate the effect of birth weight (smaller X higher) on the CEBQ scores described at 4 years of age, adjusted by birth order, gender and BMI. Results: Lower birth weight was related to increased satiety (p=0.006), slowness (p=0.030) and desire to drink (p=0.033). This group also presented less responsiveness (p=0.001), enjoyment (p=0.029) and undereating emotion (p=0.048). Conclusions: Those effects were observed within the same family which reinforces that the effect of lower birth weight in feeding behavior is more biological driven than due to environmental variation.