SPLTRAK Abstract Submission
Interaction between birth weight and the consumption of n-3 PUFAS during infancy on food fussiness at 6 years of age. 
RS REIS1, JR BERNARDI1, M STEINER2, MJ MEANEY3, RD LEVITAN4, PP SILVEIRA1
1PPGSCA,UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DO RIO GRANDE DO SUL, PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil/2MCMASTER UNIVERSITY, HAMILTON, ON, Canada/3MCGILL UNIVERSITY, MONTREAL, QC, Canada/4UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO AND CAMH, TORONTO, ON, Canada
   We aimed at investigating if fetal growth interacts with the consumption of n-3 PUFAs during infancy and affect feeding behavior at 6 years of age. The sample included 75 children recruited from a prospective birth cohort (the Maternal Adversity, Vulnerability and Neurodevelopment–MAVANproject). Fetal growth was based on the birth weight ratio (birth weight/sex-specific mean birth weight for each gestational age), and considered IUGR if BWR< 0.85. At 48-months of age, mothers filled out a Food Frequency Questionnaire, and at 72 months the Children Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ). General Linear Model adjusted for BMI at 6 years of age evaluated the correlation between IUGR and n-3 PUFAs consumption at 48 months and CEBQ domains at 6 years of age. There were 40 girls and 35 boys in this preliminary analysis. No differences were found on n-3 consumption between IUGR and non IUGR children. For the Fussiness domain, there was an interaction between IUGR and the n-3 consumption (B=-0.250, p=0.004): for IUGR children, the more n-3 PUFAs consumption reported, the lower the Fussiness score (r=-0.526, p=0.01). No effects or interactions were seen in non-IUGR children or in the other domains. N-3 food ingestion in infancy may protect IUGR children from difficult feeding behaviors later on in infancy. 

Supported By: CIHR, CAPES