SPLTRAK Abstract Submission
The Influence of Experimentally Manipulated Social Status on Eating Behavior: A Pilot Study
M CARDEL1, A DULIN-KEITA2, EJ DHURANDHAR3, K HARRIS JACKSON1, J BECK1, A TOMCZIK1, JC PETERS1, SL JOHNSON1, JO HILL1, DB ALLISON3
1University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, United States/2Brown University, Providence, RI, United States/3University of Alabama at Bimringham, Birmingham, AL, United States
   Subjective social status (SSS) – i.e. self-perceived social standing – has been consistently associated with multiple health outcomes, including weight status, but the mechanism for this relationship remains unclear. The study objective is to investigate the effect of experimentally manipulated social status on ad libitum acute dietary intake and stress outcomes as a potential mechanism for the relationship between SSS and weight status. This is a randomized, crossover study design in Hispanic young adults (n=30; age 19-25; Body Mass Index ≥18.5 and ≤30 kg/m2). At visit 1, participants complete anthropometric measurements (weight, height, waist circumference) and questionnaires, consume a standardized breakfast, and are randomized to a high or low social status condition for a game of Monopoly™. Following the game, participants are given an ad libitum buffet lunch. Stress markers (blood pressure & visual analog scales) are measured throughout. Visit 2 is the identical protocol with participants exposed to the opposite social status condition. The primary outcome is dietary intake (total energy, dietary fat, & sugar) at lunch. We will evaluate the within-subject variation in dietary intakes between the two conditions. We hypothesize that participants will consume a greater amount of calories, fat, and sugar and demonstrate higher stress following the low vs. high social status manipulation.

Supported By: University of Colorado and University of Alabama at Birmingham Nutrition Obesity Research Center